Juliet Ashton (Lily James) samples a local recipe invented by the islanders out of scarcity during the occupation.
The Red Cross provided a lifeline for starving civilians. Courtesy of The Priaulx Library & Occupation Archive

With radios forbidden, Islanders were cut off from Britain. Any information on the progress of the war was filtered and distorted by Nazi propaganda. Despite little communication with the outside world and a huge enemy population, there were still small acts of resistance. Minor acts, such as painting V signs over German swastikas, were frequent. Some Islanders sheltered escaped slave workers despite the severe cost if discovered.

Dawsey is seen wearing a blue jumper throughout the film. Originally knitted for local fishermen, the Guernsey Jumper has become fashionable around the world. Courtesy of Canal Studios
Guernsey Gin features heavily in the film. Today you can take gin tours and have tastings with local producers. Courtesy of Wheadon's Gin

Following D-Day, supplies to the Island dried up. By winter of 1944, Guernsey was on starvation rations, locals and Germans alike were at risk of starvation. The arrival of the Swedish ship SS Vega, chartered by the International Red Cross to bring in food and supplies, did much to alleviate the suffering of civilians.

The History Behind the Film Courtesy of Studio Canal
  • The History Behind the Film
  • The SS Vega
  • German Occupation
  • Occupation Life
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